"Great small home spa. Creative use of space and very relaxing. Head and scalp massage was great my hair smelled like lavender oils all day. My foot massage left me with less swelling and pain then ever and ive had a broken ankle recovering and pain for over a year. My back massage relaxed the kink in my neck and shoulders after sleeping wrong. Im so happy with the service i bought 4 more massages!."-Angelina S.
NAPA is the short form of National Automotive Parts Association which was founded in the year 1925. Napa is well known for its distributing of service items, accessories and automotive parts (Replacement) etc. Napa was founded in the Atlanta, Georgia in America. In the only United States there are about six thousands and more stores of NAPA Auto parts. Napa is the subsidiary of Genuine Parts Company, so all of its stores are working under it, all its operations are handled by Genuine Parts Company. They also provide repair and maintenance services to its customers in the name of NAPA AutoCare repair. Napa not only operates in the USA, it operates as United Auto Parts in the Canada, Mexico and various parts of Latin America. Later on in the year, 2013 Exego Group was sold to Genuine Parts Company. Exego Group was the leading distributor of automotive parts in the Australia and Asia both, they were selling all their products through Repco company in New Zealand and Australia. In National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, NAPA had also given sponsorship. They were sponsored 24 number in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series. They had also sponsored number 56 in the another series by Martin and Michael. They usually sponsored all these races.
I am not only a massage therapist but a nutritionist & trainer as well with a specialty in Sports Therapy and Recovery. I have been working 1 on 1 with many amateur & pro athletes over the last 5 years & also have almost 20 years of rehab, injury recovery and prevention experience.  Looking to do more locally after having my last child to stay closer to home so I'm now open to take on local general clients as I embark on a new journey with my wellness & fitness center. ... View Profile
TRU Health and Wellness Center is a Rehabilitation facility that focuses on the overall health of our clients.  We offer Chiropractic, Physical Therapy, and Bodywork.  Our Bodywork Sessions include full body 50 minute Thaifusion Massage and an Chiropractic adjustment.  All of our care is tailored to the needs of our clients.. no cookie cutter treatment here.
Yes, it has a seriously unglamorous name, but lymphatic drainage massage has a long list of benefits. Apart from being blissfully relaxing, manual lymph drainage (usually referred to as MLD) decreases facial puffiness, boosts the immune system, smoothes cellulite and soothes sore muscles. After spa-goers have had a lymphatic drainage massage, they may never go back to a regular massage again! Lymphatic drainage massage helps deliver cellular waste (including viruses and bacteria) to the lymph nodes. Drainage is essential because the lymphatic system lacks a pump of its own to transport lymph through the body and must rely on movement and massage to flush the fluid. Lymphatic drainage massage is good at reducing swelling, healing acne, relieving fatigue, and helps the body detox. This is a great treatment to try if you’re fasting or trying a juice cleanse. Lymphatic massage consists of gentle, rhythmic pressure, whispery soft finger strokes, and ultra-light drumming and stretching of the skin in the direction of the lymph pathways toward the lymph nodes. The logic is that this will counteract the lymph system’s tendency to become sluggish or blocked by causes like spending too much time on the couch or eating unhealthy foods. Lymphatic drainage is sometimes so relaxing that clients are lulled to sleep during treatments. Those who decide to relax with lymphatic drainage should be prepared to feel a little off-kilter following a massage. Remember to drink lots of water post-treatment. Read more about Lymphatic Drainage Massage in Spafinder's guide, What is Lymphatic Drainage Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
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