For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type. 

Hello! My name is Daniell. I am a skilled and highly trained healthcare professional with over 13 years experience as a licensed massage therapist. I am a recent graduate from Texas Woman’s University and I have a Master’s Degree in Exercise Science and Human Movement. I am currently enrolled in my Doctorate of Health Sciences. I specialize in rehabilitation therapy, cardiac rehab, and health and wellness. Other specialities include ECG Monitoring and interpretations, VO2Max/submax testing, exercise testing and prescription, vital signs, stress testing, Deep Tissue, Myofascial Release, Trigger Point, Lymphatic Drainage, Reflexolog ... View Profile
Sports massage provides benefits such as improved fitness, endurance, and performance as well as increased flexibility, recovery time, and injury prevention. But sports massage is more than just a massage for athletes. Traditionally, sports massage is a deep tissue massage that targets the deepest layers of muscle in order to stimulate blood flow. It is best done before or after an event as a means to later restore or rehabilitate. Sports massage is given within the four hours preceding an event to improve performance and help decrease injuries. It is used as a supplement to an athlete’s warm up, to enhance circulation, and to reduce excess muscle and mental tension prior to competition. It is normally shorter than a regular conditioning massage, running 10 to 15 minutes, and focuses on warming up the major muscles to be used. Getting the athlete in a good mental state for competition is another benefit. Sports massage also improves tissue pliability, readying the athlete for top performance. Certain massage techniques can help calm a nervous athlete; others can be stimulating. Post-event sports massage is given after a competition and is mainly focused on recovery. It is geared toward reducing muscle spasms and metabolic build-up that occurs with vigorous exercise. Recovery after competition involves not only tissue normalization and repair, but also general relaxation and mental calming. A recovery session can range from 15 minutes to 1.5 hours in length. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
I have been working with desk jockeys for 15 years as a massage therapist.  I help with all the pain and discomfort business people tend to have from stress, typing emails all day, and frequent air travel. I am certified in medical massage and did my advanced massage training at Lauterstein-Conway which was known as the best massage school in the US at the time. I am also an esthetician but do not practice much of that privately.  As an esthetician, I am occassionally a featured writer with Dermascope magazine. My parent company is Brainy Spa Girl, LLC where I create online course content for other massage therapists and have a skin ... View Profile
Out of all those more than 6,000 NAPA stores, there are only 1,110 stores that appear to be owned by the corporation. The remaining stores are owned by independent entrepreneurs and function according to the franchise agreement. Besides, this corporation also operates more than 15,000 car repair facilities known as NAPA AutoCare, which provide vehicle repair and maintenance services.
The National Automotive Parts Association was founded back in 1925 with an aim to provide the automotive products for a cheaper price than was available at that time. Over time, the company has grown into one of the largest automotive retailers in the United States – there are more than 6,000 NAPA stores scattered across the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the several Caribbean and Latin American countries.
The National Automotive Parts Association is owned by the Genuine Parts Company. Its parent company also purchased Exego Group, a major Australian distributor of automotive parts and accessories, in 2013. Even though Exego Group previously sold products and goods under the “Repco” brand, it has been recently spotted that many of the Repco stores have been rebranded into NAPA stores.

It used to be that New Yorkers searching for a luxurious destination spa experience had to board a plane, until the Lodge at Woodloch (just two hours from NYC) arrived in 2006 with 57 nature-inspired rooms (each with a private veranda) and a 40,000-square-foot spa. The 150 wooded acres feature a private 15-acre lake, and there's no stone unturned in terms of what you can do to get healthy: from golf to kayaking to fly fishing; from snowshoeing and hot tubbing amidst snowflakes; from bathing in the hydro massage pools to working up a sweat at TRX, spin or yoga sessions.


Swedish massage is defined by four or five somewhat familiar techniques, which have French names: effleurage (stroking), petrissage (kneading), tapotement (rhythmic choppings), and friction (rubbing). Some therapists now incorporate advanced techniques that have rehabilitating effects and stretches for improving your range of motion. But the ultimate goal here is relaxation. As the default Western massage, Swedish massage is an extremely popular, simple, soothing touch therapy. At most spas, Swedish massage is the most popular treatment, and it’s for good reason. Perfect for first-time spa-goers, Swedish massage will help to release neck knots and sooth nerves. Traditional Swedish massage, or “classical massage,” consists mainly of long strokes over oiled skin and kneading of the outer layers of muscle tissue to reduce stress and sooth sore joints and muscles. Studies have shown Swedish massage relaxes the nervous system, aids circulation, and helps with detoxification. Find out more about Swedish Massage in Spafinder's What is Swedish Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
This elegant New England inn offers spa packages perfect for a weekend getaway. Get active during the day with hiking, biking or skiing, and the come back to your serene lodge for some serious spa pampering: The 10,000-square-foot, LEED-certified facility uses locally sourced products and treatments inspired by the native flora and changing seasons of Vermont. 

I am not only a massage therapist but a nutritionist & trainer as well with a specialty in Sports Therapy and Recovery. I have been working 1 on 1 with many amateur & pro athletes over the last 5 years & also have almost 20 years of rehab, injury recovery and prevention experience.  Looking to do more locally after having my last child to stay closer to home so I'm now open to take on local general clients as I embark on a new journey with my wellness & fitness center. ... View Profile

It used to be that New Yorkers searching for a luxurious destination spa experience had to board a plane, until the Lodge at Woodloch (just two hours from NYC) arrived in 2006 with 57 nature-inspired rooms (each with a private veranda) and a 40,000-square-foot spa. The 150 wooded acres feature a private 15-acre lake, and there's no stone unturned in terms of what you can do to get healthy: from golf to kayaking to fly fishing; from snowshoeing and hot tubbing amidst snowflakes; from bathing in the hydro massage pools to working up a sweat at TRX, spin or yoga sessions.
Yes, it has a seriously unglamorous name, but lymphatic drainage massage has a long list of benefits. Apart from being blissfully relaxing, manual lymph drainage (usually referred to as MLD) decreases facial puffiness, boosts the immune system, smoothes cellulite and soothes sore muscles. After spa-goers have had a lymphatic drainage massage, they may never go back to a regular massage again! Lymphatic drainage massage helps deliver cellular waste (including viruses and bacteria) to the lymph nodes. Drainage is essential because the lymphatic system lacks a pump of its own to transport lymph through the body and must rely on movement and massage to flush the fluid. Lymphatic drainage massage is good at reducing swelling, healing acne, relieving fatigue, and helps the body detox. This is a great treatment to try if you’re fasting or trying a juice cleanse. Lymphatic massage consists of gentle, rhythmic pressure, whispery soft finger strokes, and ultra-light drumming and stretching of the skin in the direction of the lymph pathways toward the lymph nodes. The logic is that this will counteract the lymph system’s tendency to become sluggish or blocked by causes like spending too much time on the couch or eating unhealthy foods. Lymphatic drainage is sometimes so relaxing that clients are lulled to sleep during treatments. Those who decide to relax with lymphatic drainage should be prepared to feel a little off-kilter following a massage. Remember to drink lots of water post-treatment. Read more about Lymphatic Drainage Massage in Spafinder's guide, What is Lymphatic Drainage Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Escape into the trees at this luxury cottage resort hidden among 60 acres of birch forest. A walkway woven between trees will lead you to treetop treatment rooms (suspended eight feet above ground) where products made from organically grown herbs, flowers, oils and grains are used for spa services. Try a "Maine Honey Body Buzz" or a bamboo therapy massage.
I'm  a caring, passionate licensed massage therapist with over 17 years experience. I enjoy helping people to feel better through the nurturing power of therapeutic touch. I've  worked with athletes with sports injuries and weekend warriors and my sessions are uniquely and specifically tailored to your needs to ease your stress and tension and alleviate pain. 
This destination spa boasts a stunning red rock backdrop and offers rejuvenating Native American-inspired therapies such as "Spirit of the New Moon," which begins with you writing down an intention, followed by a foot bath and fully body massage and "Inner Quest." For the latter, reflective of Native American rituals, sweet grass is burned and a blanket is used to create the warmth of a sweat lodge. New offerings include an exfoliation inspired by the southwest region's pinon nut and directional meditation inspired by indigenous medicine wheel practices.
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