Hi, my name is Eiki (pronounced as "Achy") Yoshikawa. I was born in Kyoto Japan in 1966. After I graduated from a Japanese university in 1991, I transferred to and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin majoring in Psychology in 1993. After living in the San Francisco bay area for 10 years, including 7 years with a leading high-tech company, I returened to Austin in January, 2004. In 2005, I decided to study and earned the Cerificate of American Sign Language Studies from Austin Community College. In the same year, I started my massage therapy training at The Lauterstein-Conway Massage School, where I completed 300 hours of tra ... View Profile

If you’re looking for a remote getaway, it doesn’t get more private than a spa tucked away in the stunning canyons of the Southwest. Amangiri’s spa facilities are the epitome of luxury: meditate in the Floatation Pavilion (a pool in which the water and air both match your body temperature), lounge in a heated stone-lined pool, or switch between the soothing steam room and the cool plunge pool.
The practice of using essential oils dates back to Egyptian times (it’s been said Cleopatra was a fan). Today, aromatherapy is used to promote well-being and stimulate the senses in a wide range of spa treatments, varying from massage to facials to hydrotherapy. Fragrant essential extracts sourced from plants, flowers, and herbs are mainly applied for their therapeutic benefits; studies show aromatherapy not only improves your mood, but may reduce stress levels and treat insomnia. So whether you want to rejuvenate or simply smell delicious, we say aromatherapy just makes sense! Step into a spa and one of the first things you’ll notice is a signature scent wafting in the air. It’s there to entice your senses straight off the bat and sets the tone for a relaxed experience. Not only is aromatherapy used to set the mood in a spa, it’s celebrated for healing purposes as well. Different natural oils are used for different therapeutic benefits. For example, lavender endorses calm, so speak with your therapist about what you’d like to accomplish during your treatment. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?
Attention moms-to-be, we have good news! Prenatal massage can help relieve back pain, improve sleep, and boost mood. It can also decrease stress and reduce labor complications. Prenatal massage is best given while you lie on your side propped up by pillows. Neck and shoulder massage is a safe sitting-up option, as well. Be sure to always check with your doctor before booking your appointment! Prenatal and postnatal massage can be just what an expectant or new mother needs. When choosing a prenatal massage therapist, clients should ensure that their practitioner has had extensive experience practicing massage on pregnant women. No two women's pregnancy pains are identical, so experienced prenatal massage therapists cater to the specific needs of each client. Many therapists have special chairs or tables designed for pregnant clients, specifically tables that are scooped out in the belly. Again, contact your doctor before treatments. Read more in Spafinder's What is Prenatal Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
TRU Health and Wellness Center is a Rehabilitation facility that focuses on the overall health of our clients.  We offer Chiropractic, Physical Therapy, and Bodywork.  Our Bodywork Sessions include full body 50 minute Thaifusion Massage and an Chiropractic adjustment.  All of our care is tailored to the needs of our clients.. no cookie cutter treatment here. 

During a hot stone massage, the therapist heats as many as 50 basalt stones of varying sizes to 120–140 degrees fahrenheit, rubs them over your oiled body, and rests them on top of and beneath you. The therapist places the stones on your stomach, in your palms, and on your back. The stones’ warmth enhances the relaxing effects of the pressure. Some people believe the stones have healing, grounding qualities, which makes hot stone massage a more profound experience than your basic massage. The therapist will leave some of the smooth, heated massage stones in contact with your body and use others to massage you. Cold stones are sometimes incorporated, especially on the face, where they have a firming effect. Hot stone is a feel-good treatment found on most spa menus. Hot and cold stone temperatures have said to be like the ‘vascular gymnastics’ of the circulatory systems, the system that controls self-healing in the body. The heat of the stones has an immediately relaxing effect, and the therapist will glide them along your back and limbs. They should never be uncomfortably hot or nudge a shoulder blade or the spine. If they do, speak up. You may be asked to lie down on the hot stones, which looks potentially uncomfortable but isn’t as long as they’ve been carefully arranged to make contact with soft tissue. Read more about Hot Stone Massage in Spafinder's post, What is a Hot Stone Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Thai massage, also called Thai yoga massage, combines acupressure and assisted yoga postures. Thai massage is based on the flow of energy through the body and focuses on energy lines called “sen.” It doesn’t use oils or lotions and, instead of rubbing muscles, the massage therapist compresses, pulls, stretches and rocks the recipient’s body to promote the flow of energy through these sen. In this form of massage therapy, practitioners use their hands, knees, legs and feet to apply deep muscle compression and stretch the body. It’s often performed on a mat on the floor instead of on a massage table. Like most forms of massage, Thai massage is used to relieve stress, improve range of motion and enhance flexibility. Some people also use Thai massage to address a range of health issues, including:  
As it was pointed above, NAPA is represented not only in the United States but also in several other countries, including Canada and Mexico. At this point, we will reveal what are the typical working hours of NAPA stores in the United States. If you wish to get to know about the hours of a particular NAPA store or NAPA stores beyond the United States, we can suggest you make use of the instructions given above: call a small box in the left-upper corner of the map and click on the “View Larger Map” text button.
Yes, it has a seriously unglamorous name, but lymphatic drainage massage has a long list of benefits. Apart from being blissfully relaxing, manual lymph drainage (usually referred to as MLD) decreases facial puffiness, boosts the immune system, smoothes cellulite and soothes sore muscles. After spa-goers have had a lymphatic drainage massage, they may never go back to a regular massage again! Lymphatic drainage massage helps deliver cellular waste (including viruses and bacteria) to the lymph nodes. Drainage is essential because the lymphatic system lacks a pump of its own to transport lymph through the body and must rely on movement and massage to flush the fluid. Lymphatic drainage massage is good at reducing swelling, healing acne, relieving fatigue, and helps the body detox. This is a great treatment to try if you’re fasting or trying a juice cleanse. Lymphatic massage consists of gentle, rhythmic pressure, whispery soft finger strokes, and ultra-light drumming and stretching of the skin in the direction of the lymph pathways toward the lymph nodes. The logic is that this will counteract the lymph system’s tendency to become sluggish or blocked by causes like spending too much time on the couch or eating unhealthy foods. Lymphatic drainage is sometimes so relaxing that clients are lulled to sleep during treatments. Those who decide to relax with lymphatic drainage should be prepared to feel a little off-kilter following a massage. Remember to drink lots of water post-treatment. Read more about Lymphatic Drainage Massage in Spafinder's guide, What is Lymphatic Drainage Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Attention moms-to-be, we have good news! Prenatal massage can help relieve back pain, improve sleep, and boost mood. It can also decrease stress and reduce labor complications. Prenatal massage is best given while you lie on your side propped up by pillows. Neck and shoulder massage is a safe sitting-up option, as well. Be sure to always check with your doctor before booking your appointment! Prenatal and postnatal massage can be just what an expectant or new mother needs. When choosing a prenatal massage therapist, clients should ensure that their practitioner has had extensive experience practicing massage on pregnant women. No two women's pregnancy pains are identical, so experienced prenatal massage therapists cater to the specific needs of each client. Many therapists have special chairs or tables designed for pregnant clients, specifically tables that are scooped out in the belly. Again, contact your doctor before treatments. Read more in Spafinder's What is Prenatal Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
×