Sports massage provides benefits such as improved fitness, endurance, and performance as well as increased flexibility, recovery time, and injury prevention. But sports massage is more than just a massage for athletes. Traditionally, sports massage is a deep tissue massage that targets the deepest layers of muscle in order to stimulate blood flow. It is best done before or after an event as a means to later restore or rehabilitate. Sports massage is given within the four hours preceding an event to improve performance and help decrease injuries. It is used as a supplement to an athlete’s warm up, to enhance circulation, and to reduce excess muscle and mental tension prior to competition. It is normally shorter than a regular conditioning massage, running 10 to 15 minutes, and focuses on warming up the major muscles to be used. Getting the athlete in a good mental state for competition is another benefit. Sports massage also improves tissue pliability, readying the athlete for top performance. Certain massage techniques can help calm a nervous athlete; others can be stimulating. Post-event sports massage is given after a competition and is mainly focused on recovery. It is geared toward reducing muscle spasms and metabolic build-up that occurs with vigorous exercise. Recovery after competition involves not only tissue normalization and repair, but also general relaxation and mental calming. A recovery session can range from 15 minutes to 1.5 hours in length. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
If your dream weekend getaway includes having the option to explore a bustling city between spa treatments, consider the spa at The Peninsula New York. Its award-winning spa includes a blend of signature treatments with Asian, European and Ayurvedic philosophies. Try the "Escape From The City" package (body wrap exfoliation, holistic massage and remodeling facial) or the "Red Carpet Ready" (healthy glow facial, salt and oil scrub, body wrap, hair wash and blowout and professional makeup application — plus champagne and lunch!).
Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
At this year-round luxury destination, pampering is prime at the five-star spa, where you'll find hot and cold plunge baths, couple treatment rooms, Vichy wet treatment rooms and even a hair and makeup salon. Try a gemstone facial (meant to dramatically increase hydration) or an alpine glow body wrap (featuring immune-boosting honeybee propolis to rejuvenate dry skin).
Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.

"Wow. I'm not one to write reviews but I think I would be doing many a disservice if I didn't share what I just experienced with Josie. 1st impression: Josie was very prompt to get in touch with me after my initial request on thumbtack which to me, goes a long way with showing professionalism. We were able to set up our 1st meeting quickly with her online booking calendar. Massage: It has been over three years since my last massage. I was due. I have extreme tightness in my middle back, shoulders, and hamstrings from working out and playing golf (while rarely warming up). After telling her what I thought I needed, Josie went ahead and got after my "problem areas" and then found some other areas I didn't even think needed work! Its obvious shes been doing this a long time, as she has a knack for knowing where I needed work without me even knowing myself. It impresses me when someone can be so in tune with what they do, it looks effortless. Conclusion: I am very happy with my decision to get some bodywork done. A massage, like a tire alignment or oil change to a car, is important self-maintenance. I will not be going three more years without a massage anymore after the service Josie provided. As a matter of fact I already have one scheduled at the beginning of June. Thank you Josie!"


Therapeutic Massage (Deep Tissue, Sports Massage, Therapeutic Stretch) As a Licensed Massage Therapist (LMT), my goal is to offer a customized massage for YOUR specific needs.  Time is taken to not only address the issues you are experiencing but to provide nurturing and relaxation for the parasympathetic nervous system to combat stress and anxiety also. Hot AND Cold Stones are effective for healing and I use both in my practice. As a Registered Yoga Teacher, I utilize breath and stretch techniques when applicable during my massage sessions. ... View Profile
Like the name suggests, deep tissue massage targets your body’s deepest layers of muscle and releases tension in overstressed areas. When your muscles are severely knotted, this therapeutic treatment is designed to break it up. Deep tissue massage is a mix of slow, short strokes and penetrating finger pressure focused on tight, contracted areas. The therapist employs her thumbs, forearms, and even elbows to work muscle tissue and relieve tension. Be warned, if it’s your first massage or you don’t get much exercise, steer clear of deep tissue. You could end up very sore the next day. A deep tissue massage can help heal injuries and release knots caused by stress. Deep tissue massage requires a solid understanding of anatomy, but top therapists don’t just have technical skill. They’re highly sensitive and aware of reactions taking place in the body during the work and know when to back off. For more read Spafinder's guide to What is Deep Tissue Massage? If Deep Tissue isn't what you're looking for, find an alternative by reading Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Not only does this resort offer everything from animal safaris to zip lines, but its spa is also topnotch (besides, you need a way to relax after all those activities!). Wellness retreats are offered throughout the year with both daylong and multi-day options, and regular spa treatments include herbal wraps, spa reflexology and a water bath ritual meant to improve blood and lymph flow.
Attention moms-to-be, we have good news! Prenatal massage can help relieve back pain, improve sleep, and boost mood. It can also decrease stress and reduce labor complications. Prenatal massage is best given while you lie on your side propped up by pillows. Neck and shoulder massage is a safe sitting-up option, as well. Be sure to always check with your doctor before booking your appointment! Prenatal and postnatal massage can be just what an expectant or new mother needs. When choosing a prenatal massage therapist, clients should ensure that their practitioner has had extensive experience practicing massage on pregnant women. No two women's pregnancy pains are identical, so experienced prenatal massage therapists cater to the specific needs of each client. Many therapists have special chairs or tables designed for pregnant clients, specifically tables that are scooped out in the belly. Again, contact your doctor before treatments. Read more in Spafinder's What is Prenatal Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Rejuvenate at a hotel spa where you can still sneak in some Rodeo Drive shopping during the day. This Beverly Hills luxury hotel spa is centered around a mineral wellness pool. The 20,000-square-foot space is inspired by the Spanish Colonial Revival, and packages include the "Day of Indulgence," which offers a body rescue massage, facial and manicure/pedicure, plus lunch credit.
Based on the transferring of energy, Reiki is said to release blocked energy from parts of your body while moving it to the areas that are in need of healing. Originating from Japan, the technique requires the Reiki Master to place hands just above the body or lightly touching the body as the client lays on the massage table fully clothed. Reiki healing is intended to help the client relax and de-stress, heal physical or emotional pain, detoxify the body, help aid in the healing process, gain universal life energy, and even stimulate the immune system. Typically a Reiki session has you laying on a massage table fully-clothed for 50-minutes to an hour. The master will place his or her hands over the areas of your body that contain blocked energy. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Like the name suggests, deep tissue massage targets your body’s deepest layers of muscle and releases tension in overstressed areas. When your muscles are severely knotted, this therapeutic treatment is designed to break it up. Deep tissue massage is a mix of slow, short strokes and penetrating finger pressure focused on tight, contracted areas. The therapist employs her thumbs, forearms, and even elbows to work muscle tissue and relieve tension. Be warned, if it’s your first massage or you don’t get much exercise, steer clear of deep tissue. You could end up very sore the next day. A deep tissue massage can help heal injuries and release knots caused by stress. Deep tissue massage requires a solid understanding of anatomy, but top therapists don’t just have technical skill. They’re highly sensitive and aware of reactions taking place in the body during the work and know when to back off. For more read Spafinder's guide to What is Deep Tissue Massage? If Deep Tissue isn't what you're looking for, find an alternative by reading Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
In the desert about 125 miles north of Los Angeles, you'll find palm trees, cacti, flowering vines, and dramatic mountain vistas as you detox, Hollywood-style, in this juice-fast led program. Guests often emerge reporting a one to three pound per day weight loss—as well as clearer heads and brighter eyes and skin. Credit goes to both the clean liquid diet and the raft of classes offered, including breath work, Reiki, sound-healing, yoga of every flavor, "creative visioning"—and even sessions about transitioning back to solid food.
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