Sports massage provides benefits such as improved fitness, endurance, and performance as well as increased flexibility, recovery time, and injury prevention. But sports massage is more than just a massage for athletes. Traditionally, sports massage is a deep tissue massage that targets the deepest layers of muscle in order to stimulate blood flow. It is best done before or after an event as a means to later restore or rehabilitate. Sports massage is given within the four hours preceding an event to improve performance and help decrease injuries. It is used as a supplement to an athlete’s warm up, to enhance circulation, and to reduce excess muscle and mental tension prior to competition. It is normally shorter than a regular conditioning massage, running 10 to 15 minutes, and focuses on warming up the major muscles to be used. Getting the athlete in a good mental state for competition is another benefit. Sports massage also improves tissue pliability, readying the athlete for top performance. Certain massage techniques can help calm a nervous athlete; others can be stimulating. Post-event sports massage is given after a competition and is mainly focused on recovery. It is geared toward reducing muscle spasms and metabolic build-up that occurs with vigorous exercise. Recovery after competition involves not only tissue normalization and repair, but also general relaxation and mental calming. A recovery session can range from 15 minutes to 1.5 hours in length. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
The practice of using essential oils dates back to Egyptian times (it’s been said Cleopatra was a fan). Today, aromatherapy is used to promote well-being and stimulate the senses in a wide range of spa treatments, varying from massage to facials to hydrotherapy. Fragrant essential extracts sourced from plants, flowers, and herbs are mainly applied for their therapeutic benefits; studies show aromatherapy not only improves your mood, but may reduce stress levels and treat insomnia. So whether you want to rejuvenate or simply smell delicious, we say aromatherapy just makes sense! Step into a spa and one of the first things you’ll notice is a signature scent wafting in the air. It’s there to entice your senses straight off the bat and sets the tone for a relaxed experience. Not only is aromatherapy used to set the mood in a spa, it’s celebrated for healing purposes as well. Different natural oils are used for different therapeutic benefits. For example, lavender endorses calm, so speak with your therapist about what you’d like to accomplish during your treatment. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?
Between horseback riding and mountain biking at this ranch and resort, be sure to carve out plenty of time for the spa, which is situated along a creek in a beautiful meadow. Two massage tents are suspended over the water with glass floors (talk about an amazing view!) and treatments include signatures like the "Cowboy Soak," which involves a moonlit soak in therapeutic copper tubs overlooking a mountain range.
Therapeutic Massage (Deep Tissue, Sports Massage, Therapeutic Stretch) As a Licensed Massage Therapist (LMT), my goal is to offer a customized massage for YOUR specific needs.  Time is taken to not only address the issues you are experiencing but to provide nurturing and relaxation for the parasympathetic nervous system to combat stress and anxiety also. Hot AND Cold Stones are effective for healing and I use both in my practice. As a Registered Yoga Teacher, I utilize breath and stretch techniques when applicable during my massage sessions. ... View Profile
Hi, my name is Eiki (pronounced as "Achy") Yoshikawa. I was born in Kyoto Japan in 1966. After I graduated from a Japanese university in 1991, I transferred to and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin majoring in Psychology in 1993. After living in the San Francisco bay area for 10 years, including 7 years with a leading high-tech company, I returened to Austin in January, 2004. In 2005, I decided to study and earned the Cerificate of American Sign Language Studies from Austin Community College. In the same year, I started my massage therapy training at The Lauterstein-Conway Massage School, where I completed 300 hours of tra ... View Profile
"Mely gave a wonderful massage. The atmosphere was relaxing and the massage was very helpful for soothing my shoulders and lower back. Josette took her time to do a great mani and pedi. Very relaxing as well as having good conversation. Lidia did a nice style on my hair but I had to wait about 5 minutes because she was late with a previous client. Caught a bit of heat on skin from the hair dryer.."-Susan A.
"The Groupon is a great value for money. It’s a low frills place but great to have nearby and a nice place to spend a couple of hours with the saunas, steam room, hot tub and pool. When we arrived we were told we were not allowed to use our Groupon on a Sunday though this was not written in the Groupon deal terms. The manager was nice and let us in, but I’d recommend the terms be made clear for this deal and when it can be used.."-Rachel C.
This elegant New England inn offers spa packages perfect for a weekend getaway. Get active during the day with hiking, biking or skiing, and the come back to your serene lodge for some serious spa pampering: The 10,000-square-foot, LEED-certified facility uses locally sourced products and treatments inspired by the native flora and changing seasons of Vermont.
In the desert about 125 miles north of Los Angeles, you'll find palm trees, cacti, flowering vines, and dramatic mountain vistas as you detox, Hollywood-style, in this juice-fast led program. Guests often emerge reporting a one to three pound per day weight loss—as well as clearer heads and brighter eyes and skin. Credit goes to both the clean liquid diet and the raft of classes offered, including breath work, Reiki, sound-healing, yoga of every flavor, "creative visioning"—and even sessions about transitioning back to solid food.
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