Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.

Whether you’re just getting started with a Swedish massage or reflexology, enjoying a romantic couple’s massage for two, or healing your body with a sports massage, Spafinder's listings include quality providers with endless modalities and customizations at a spa or wellness locations near you. If you’re going to unwind or you want to work out stubborn kinks, make sure you find the right massage for your needs. Often the massage therapist will customize treatments to address any concerns you may have and to make the massage perfect for you. Wear what feels comfortable to get the most out of your experience and be sure to speak up about what feels good and what doesn’t - this experience is all about you! To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?
Not only does this resort offer everything from animal safaris to zip lines, but its spa is also topnotch (besides, you need a way to relax after all those activities!). Wellness retreats are offered throughout the year with both daylong and multi-day options, and regular spa treatments include herbal wraps, spa reflexology and a water bath ritual meant to improve blood and lymph flow.
A native Hawaiian healing practice, Lomi Lomi or lomilomi massage is a deeply nurturing style of massage characterized by fast flowing movement. There is also a spiritual side therapists focus on giving the treatment with love and intention. Traditional practitioners may offer a prayer beforehand. There are 100,000 styles of Lomi Lomi massage, according to author Makana Risser Chai, so it’s hard to know what you’ll be getting. In general, strokes are long, flowing, fast, and rhythmic, and therapists use their hands, forearms, and occasionally their fists for deep pressure. Lomi Lomi treatments are typically choreographed and given in time to special music (mostly drums). Beware treatments that are “lomi lomi-inspired.” Lomi lomi massage training takes several years to complete, either with a mentor or through a multi-level training program. Spas with seriously trained therapists will be glad to tell you where their staff learned it. You may be asked to remove all clothing (you’ll still be covered with a sarong or sheet) so the therapist can keep the quick tempo and move from your shoulders to your glutes and back up in two seconds flat. Read about Lomi Lomi Massage in Spafinder's post, What is an Hawaiian or Lomi Lomi Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.  
Attention moms-to-be, we have good news! Prenatal massage can help relieve back pain, improve sleep, and boost mood. It can also decrease stress and reduce labor complications. Prenatal massage is best given while you lie on your side propped up by pillows. Neck and shoulder massage is a safe sitting-up option, as well. Be sure to always check with your doctor before booking your appointment! Prenatal and postnatal massage can be just what an expectant or new mother needs. When choosing a prenatal massage therapist, clients should ensure that their practitioner has had extensive experience practicing massage on pregnant women. No two women's pregnancy pains are identical, so experienced prenatal massage therapists cater to the specific needs of each client. Many therapists have special chairs or tables designed for pregnant clients, specifically tables that are scooped out in the belly. Again, contact your doctor before treatments. Read more in Spafinder's What is Prenatal Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
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