Swedish massage is proven to lower blood pressure and reduce stress, according to the International Journal of Preventative Medicine, as well as to relieve depression and anxiety and aid in recuperation from chronic illness. Swedish massage is also referred to as classical massage, and — contrary to popular understanding — does not originate from Sweden. There are five main strokes, or movements, that make up a Swedish massage: effleurage, friction, petrissage, tapotement and vibration. Each technique was created to help soothe, stimulate, soften, and rejuvenate muscles and other soft tissue. 

Thai massage, also called Thai yoga massage, combines acupressure and assisted yoga postures. Thai massage is based on the flow of energy through the body and focuses on energy lines called “sen.” It doesn’t use oils or lotions and, instead of rubbing muscles, the massage therapist compresses, pulls, stretches and rocks the recipient’s body to promote the flow of energy through these sen. In this form of massage therapy, practitioners use their hands, knees, legs and feet to apply deep muscle compression and stretch the body. It’s often performed on a mat on the floor instead of on a massage table. Like most forms of massage, Thai massage is used to relieve stress, improve range of motion and enhance flexibility. Some people also use Thai massage to address a range of health issues, including:  

"The Groupon is a great value for money. It’s a low frills place but great to have nearby and a nice place to spend a couple of hours with the saunas, steam room, hot tub and pool. When we arrived we were told we were not allowed to use our Groupon on a Sunday though this was not written in the Groupon deal terms. The manager was nice and let us in, but I’d recommend the terms be made clear for this deal and when it can be used.."-Rachel C.
I'm  a caring, passionate licensed massage therapist with over 17 years experience. I enjoy helping people to feel better through the nurturing power of therapeutic touch. I've  worked with athletes with sports injuries and weekend warriors and my sessions are uniquely and specifically tailored to your needs to ease your stress and tension and alleviate pain. 

"Melt Spa is great! The reception area is very pretty with grey and silver sparkles and cozy furniture. Jo Anna at the front knew who I was when I walked through the door as a new client! She was so sweet and helpful in explains costs, options, etc. Brandy was my massage therapist. Not only was she super friendly but she took the time to do a mini-consult with me to find what I needed and didn't want. I have lower back pain at times and she was great with being gentle in that area, but then changed her technique with my upper back and shoulders to a deeper massage at my request. She was great! Rian, the new owner, was at the front when I checked out and we chatted for a little bit about the spa, etc. She seems to really want to provide wellness opportunities for the community and gain long-time customers at the same time. Overall, absolutely recommend!"
Escape into the trees at this luxury cottage resort hidden among 60 acres of birch forest. A walkway woven between trees will lead you to treetop treatment rooms (suspended eight feet above ground) where products made from organically grown herbs, flowers, oils and grains are used for spa services. Try a "Maine Honey Body Buzz" or a bamboo therapy massage.

For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.

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