"Melt Spa is great! The reception area is very pretty with grey and silver sparkles and cozy furniture. Jo Anna at the front knew who I was when I walked through the door as a new client! She was so sweet and helpful in explains costs, options, etc. Brandy was my massage therapist. Not only was she super friendly but she took the time to do a mini-consult with me to find what I needed and didn't want. I have lower back pain at times and she was great with being gentle in that area, but then changed her technique with my upper back and shoulders to a deeper massage at my request. She was great! Rian, the new owner, was at the front when I checked out and we chatted for a little bit about the spa, etc. She seems to really want to provide wellness opportunities for the community and gain long-time customers at the same time. Overall, absolutely recommend!"
"Massage is a necessity no a luxury" that is our belive and because of that we offer personalized therapies, design to target that what the client desire and allow us to deliver results faster. our therapist have been in the industrie for 5 to 10 yrs aldo hold the license in other states and we have esthetic license, certification in Swedish massage, deep tissue, lymphatic drainage, sport massage, geriatric, prenatal, oncology, medical, kinesiotape, hot stone, neuromuscular and more. ... View Profile

Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.

Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Thai massage, also called Thai yoga massage, combines acupressure and assisted yoga postures. Thai massage is based on the flow of energy through the body and focuses on energy lines called “sen.” It doesn’t use oils or lotions and, instead of rubbing muscles, the massage therapist compresses, pulls, stretches and rocks the recipient’s body to promote the flow of energy through these sen. In this form of massage therapy, practitioners use their hands, knees, legs and feet to apply deep muscle compression and stretch the body. It’s often performed on a mat on the floor instead of on a massage table. Like most forms of massage, Thai massage is used to relieve stress, improve range of motion and enhance flexibility. Some people also use Thai massage to address a range of health issues, including:  
Yes, it has a seriously unglamorous name, but lymphatic drainage massage has a long list of benefits. Apart from being blissfully relaxing, manual lymph drainage (usually referred to as MLD) decreases facial puffiness, boosts the immune system, smoothes cellulite and soothes sore muscles. After spa-goers have had a lymphatic drainage massage, they may never go back to a regular massage again! Lymphatic drainage massage helps deliver cellular waste (including viruses and bacteria) to the lymph nodes. Drainage is essential because the lymphatic system lacks a pump of its own to transport lymph through the body and must rely on movement and massage to flush the fluid. Lymphatic drainage massage is good at reducing swelling, healing acne, relieving fatigue, and helps the body detox. This is a great treatment to try if you’re fasting or trying a juice cleanse. Lymphatic massage consists of gentle, rhythmic pressure, whispery soft finger strokes, and ultra-light drumming and stretching of the skin in the direction of the lymph pathways toward the lymph nodes. The logic is that this will counteract the lymph system’s tendency to become sluggish or blocked by causes like spending too much time on the couch or eating unhealthy foods. Lymphatic drainage is sometimes so relaxing that clients are lulled to sleep during treatments. Those who decide to relax with lymphatic drainage should be prepared to feel a little off-kilter following a massage. Remember to drink lots of water post-treatment. Read more about Lymphatic Drainage Massage in Spafinder's guide, What is Lymphatic Drainage Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
The National Automotive Parts Association is owned by the Genuine Parts Company. Its parent company also purchased Exego Group, a major Australian distributor of automotive parts and accessories, in 2013. Even though Exego Group previously sold products and goods under the “Repco” brand, it has been recently spotted that many of the Repco stores have been rebranded into NAPA stores.

Like the name suggests, deep tissue massage targets your body’s deepest layers of muscle and releases tension in overstressed areas. When your muscles are severely knotted, this therapeutic treatment is designed to break it up. Deep tissue massage is a mix of slow, short strokes and penetrating finger pressure focused on tight, contracted areas. The therapist employs her thumbs, forearms, and even elbows to work muscle tissue and relieve tension. Be warned, if it’s your first massage or you don’t get much exercise, steer clear of deep tissue. You could end up very sore the next day. A deep tissue massage can help heal injuries and release knots caused by stress. Deep tissue massage requires a solid understanding of anatomy, but top therapists don’t just have technical skill. They’re highly sensitive and aware of reactions taking place in the body during the work and know when to back off. For more read Spafinder's guide to What is Deep Tissue Massage? If Deep Tissue isn't what you're looking for, find an alternative by reading Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
During Thai massage the therapist puts you through a series of stretches that cover the entire body. You lie on a floor mat or on a table wide enough to accommodate you and the therapist, and you wear loose-fitting clothing, often supplied by the spa, because there’s no way a sheet can stay put during these moves! The therapist might kneel on the back of your legs and pull your arms to arch your back and open your chest, or place her shoulder under your heel to lift your leg and stretch your hamstring. Thai massage also includes deep pressure-point work to stimulate the sen, or the body’s energy pathways. Thai massage is a little intense at first especially if you’re used to Swedish massage and don’t normally do much stretching. It reminds you that massage isn’t just pressure applied to you by someone else, but a balancing of the body by limbering joints and loosening muscles through movement and strategic pressure. Unlike Swedish massage, there’s a lot of interaction here between you and your therapist. To move you around the mat efficiently, the Thai massage therapist uses his or her body to leverage you into the elongating stretches. He or she also will use your body as a tool for deepening these stretches by sitting on your feet and legs or pushing or pulling you into twists. Read more about Thai Massage with Spafinder's What is Thai Massage? post. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Thai massage, also called Thai yoga massage, combines acupressure and assisted yoga postures. Thai massage is based on the flow of energy through the body and focuses on energy lines called “sen.” It doesn’t use oils or lotions and, instead of rubbing muscles, the massage therapist compresses, pulls, stretches and rocks the recipient’s body to promote the flow of energy through these sen. In this form of massage therapy, practitioners use their hands, knees, legs and feet to apply deep muscle compression and stretch the body. It’s often performed on a mat on the floor instead of on a massage table. Like most forms of massage, Thai massage is used to relieve stress, improve range of motion and enhance flexibility. Some people also use Thai massage to address a range of health issues, including:  
Located in downtown Chicago's River North culinary district, Eurostars Magnificent Mile Hotel, complete with a full-service spa, is a stylish hideaway evoking sophistication and a sustainable philosophy in a flawless fit. The Spa at Eurostars Magnificent Mile features signature treatments such as the exotic Hanakasumi, based on ancient Japanese traditions, and a fitness center sporting Italian Technogym equipment and city views. Guest rooms are designed with natural, ecological woods, and the restaurant, freestyle food + drink, also built with repurposed materials, entertains with ?comfort chic? cuisine and a raw bar. At night, the award-winning hotel sizzles on the 26th floor, with Apogee sky lounge, the only year-round, indoor/outdoor lounge in Chicago, featuring live DJs nightly and an outdoor fire pit for added ambience.
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