Between horseback riding and mountain biking at this ranch and resort, be sure to carve out plenty of time for the spa, which is situated along a creek in a beautiful meadow. Two massage tents are suspended over the water with glass floors (talk about an amazing view!) and treatments include signatures like the "Cowboy Soak," which involves a moonlit soak in therapeutic copper tubs overlooking a mountain range.
Yes, it has a seriously unglamorous name, but lymphatic drainage massage has a long list of benefits. Apart from being blissfully relaxing, manual lymph drainage (usually referred to as MLD) decreases facial puffiness, boosts the immune system, smoothes cellulite and soothes sore muscles. After spa-goers have had a lymphatic drainage massage, they may never go back to a regular massage again! Lymphatic drainage massage helps deliver cellular waste (including viruses and bacteria) to the lymph nodes. Drainage is essential because the lymphatic system lacks a pump of its own to transport lymph through the body and must rely on movement and massage to flush the fluid. Lymphatic drainage massage is good at reducing swelling, healing acne, relieving fatigue, and helps the body detox. This is a great treatment to try if you’re fasting or trying a juice cleanse. Lymphatic massage consists of gentle, rhythmic pressure, whispery soft finger strokes, and ultra-light drumming and stretching of the skin in the direction of the lymph pathways toward the lymph nodes. The logic is that this will counteract the lymph system’s tendency to become sluggish or blocked by causes like spending too much time on the couch or eating unhealthy foods. Lymphatic drainage is sometimes so relaxing that clients are lulled to sleep during treatments. Those who decide to relax with lymphatic drainage should be prepared to feel a little off-kilter following a massage. Remember to drink lots of water post-treatment. Read more about Lymphatic Drainage Massage in Spafinder's guide, What is Lymphatic Drainage Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
"Massage is a necessity no a luxury" that is our belive and because of that we offer personalized therapies, design to target that what the client desire and allow us to deliver results faster. our therapist have been in the industrie for 5 to 10 yrs aldo hold the license in other states and we have esthetic license, certification in Swedish massage, deep tissue, lymphatic drainage, sport massage, geriatric, prenatal, oncology, medical, kinesiotape, hot stone, neuromuscular and more. ... View Profile
The practice of using essential oils dates back to Egyptian times (it’s been said Cleopatra was a fan). Today, aromatherapy is used to promote well-being and stimulate the senses in a wide range of spa treatments, varying from massage to facials to hydrotherapy. Fragrant essential extracts sourced from plants, flowers, and herbs are mainly applied for their therapeutic benefits; studies show aromatherapy not only improves your mood, but may reduce stress levels and treat insomnia. So whether you want to rejuvenate or simply smell delicious, we say aromatherapy just makes sense! Step into a spa and one of the first things you’ll notice is a signature scent wafting in the air. It’s there to entice your senses straight off the bat and sets the tone for a relaxed experience. Not only is aromatherapy used to set the mood in a spa, it’s celebrated for healing purposes as well. Different natural oils are used for different therapeutic benefits. For example, lavender endorses calm, so speak with your therapist about what you’d like to accomplish during your treatment. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?
"Melt Spa is great! The reception area is very pretty with grey and silver sparkles and cozy furniture. Jo Anna at the front knew who I was when I walked through the door as a new client! She was so sweet and helpful in explains costs, options, etc. Brandy was my massage therapist. Not only was she super friendly but she took the time to do a mini-consult with me to find what I needed and didn't want. I have lower back pain at times and she was great with being gentle in that area, but then changed her technique with my upper back and shoulders to a deeper massage at my request. She was great! Rian, the new owner, was at the front when I checked out and we chatted for a little bit about the spa, etc. She seems to really want to provide wellness opportunities for the community and gain long-time customers at the same time. Overall, absolutely recommend!"
During a hot stone massage, the therapist heats as many as 50 basalt stones of varying sizes to 120–140 degrees fahrenheit, rubs them over your oiled body, and rests them on top of and beneath you. The therapist places the stones on your stomach, in your palms, and on your back. The stones’ warmth enhances the relaxing effects of the pressure. Some people believe the stones have healing, grounding qualities, which makes hot stone massage a more profound experience than your basic massage. The therapist will leave some of the smooth, heated massage stones in contact with your body and use others to massage you. Cold stones are sometimes incorporated, especially on the face, where they have a firming effect. Hot stone is a feel-good treatment found on most spa menus. Hot and cold stone temperatures have said to be like the ‘vascular gymnastics’ of the circulatory systems, the system that controls self-healing in the body. The heat of the stones has an immediately relaxing effect, and the therapist will glide them along your back and limbs. They should never be uncomfortably hot or nudge a shoulder blade or the spine. If they do, speak up. You may be asked to lie down on the hot stones, which looks potentially uncomfortable but isn’t as long as they’ve been carefully arranged to make contact with soft tissue. Read more about Hot Stone Massage in Spafinder's post, What is a Hot Stone Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
It used to be that New Yorkers searching for a luxurious destination spa experience had to board a plane, until the Lodge at Woodloch (just two hours from NYC) arrived in 2006 with 57 nature-inspired rooms (each with a private veranda) and a 40,000-square-foot spa. The 150 wooded acres feature a private 15-acre lake, and there's no stone unturned in terms of what you can do to get healthy: from golf to kayaking to fly fishing; from snowshoeing and hot tubbing amidst snowflakes; from bathing in the hydro massage pools to working up a sweat at TRX, spin or yoga sessions.
If you’re looking for a remote getaway, it doesn’t get more private than a spa tucked away in the stunning canyons of the Southwest. Amangiri’s spa facilities are the epitome of luxury: meditate in the Floatation Pavilion (a pool in which the water and air both match your body temperature), lounge in a heated stone-lined pool, or switch between the soothing steam room and the cool plunge pool.
Like the name suggests, deep tissue massage targets your body’s deepest layers of muscle and releases tension in overstressed areas. When your muscles are severely knotted, this therapeutic treatment is designed to break it up. Deep tissue massage is a mix of slow, short strokes and penetrating finger pressure focused on tight, contracted areas. The therapist employs her thumbs, forearms, and even elbows to work muscle tissue and relieve tension. Be warned, if it’s your first massage or you don’t get much exercise, steer clear of deep tissue. You could end up very sore the next day. A deep tissue massage can help heal injuries and release knots caused by stress. Deep tissue massage requires a solid understanding of anatomy, but top therapists don’t just have technical skill. They’re highly sensitive and aware of reactions taking place in the body during the work and know when to back off. For more read Spafinder's guide to What is Deep Tissue Massage? If Deep Tissue isn't what you're looking for, find an alternative by reading Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.

Those Scandinavians knew what they were doing. If you’ve never been to a classic Nordic Spa we are happy to lead you to bliss. It’s all based on a circuit of thermal baths that take your body through a complete cleansing and physical conditioning. Because you are moving between steam baths and cold pools, improved blood circulation is one of the major benefits. These spectacular spas are often found immersed in epic natural environments. So, think of it as the ultimate winter warm-up, perfect for the après-skier or the “I’ll spa while you ski” set. This invigorating day spa experience can be had year-round. Get ready to take hydrotherapy to a holistic new level. The first stop on the Nordic Spa circuit is usually a dry sauna or steam bath, which raises your body temperature to dilate pores and flush out toxins. The next stage of this water therapy involves a cold shower, or a very chilly dip in a sub-zero pool. Grin and bear it. We swear it’s good for you! Finally, to get the most out of this hyper hydrotherapy experience, repeat the hot, cold sequence three or four times before tucking in to a cozy relaxation room.
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