"The Groupon is a great value for money. It’s a low frills place but great to have nearby and a nice place to spend a couple of hours with the saunas, steam room, hot tub and pool. When we arrived we were told we were not allowed to use our Groupon on a Sunday though this was not written in the Groupon deal terms. The manager was nice and let us in, but I’d recommend the terms be made clear for this deal and when it can be used.."-Rachel C.


Hi, my name is Eiki (pronounced as "Achy") Yoshikawa. I was born in Kyoto Japan in 1966. After I graduated from a Japanese university in 1991, I transferred to and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin majoring in Psychology in 1993. After living in the San Francisco bay area for 10 years, including 7 years with a leading high-tech company, I returened to Austin in January, 2004. In 2005, I decided to study and earned the Cerificate of American Sign Language Studies from Austin Community College. In the same year, I started my massage therapy training at The Lauterstein-Conway Massage School, where I completed 300 hours of tra ... View Profile
Certified Reiki Master Practotioner + Licensed Massage Therapist. My Mission is to help heal mankind through utilizing my education and skills to facilitate balance wellness and healing for the mental physical and spiritual. Recieve a catered personalized infused massage from energy work to Theraputic or just relaxing bodywork using crystals affirmations solfeggio frequencies and aromatherapy to enhance a happy healthy lifestyle!  Facebook.com/TheeHealingGoddess  ... View Profile
Therapeutic Massage (Deep Tissue, Sports Massage, Therapeutic Stretch) As a Licensed Massage Therapist (LMT), my goal is to offer a customized massage for YOUR specific needs.  Time is taken to not only address the issues you are experiencing but to provide nurturing and relaxation for the parasympathetic nervous system to combat stress and anxiety also. Hot AND Cold Stones are effective for healing and I use both in my practice. As a Registered Yoga Teacher, I utilize breath and stretch techniques when applicable during my massage sessions. ... View Profile
I'm  a caring, passionate licensed massage therapist with over 17 years experience. I enjoy helping people to feel better through the nurturing power of therapeutic touch. I've  worked with athletes with sports injuries and weekend warriors and my sessions are uniquely and specifically tailored to your needs to ease your stress and tension and alleviate pain. 
Enjoy 25,000 square feet of spa paradise at this Texas resort's LakeHouse Spa, where a mix of ancient and modern therapeutic techniques are practiced. Spa packages include a couple's package in the private in-ground spa (services include a Quench Body Wrap, lunch at the café and, of course, massages) and a mother-daughter package (includes aromatherapy and manicures/pedicures). Acupuncture, floating meditation and "inner strength" massages are also available.

Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
I have been working with desk jockeys for 15 years as a massage therapist.  I help with all the pain and discomfort business people tend to have from stress, typing emails all day, and frequent air travel. I am certified in medical massage and did my advanced massage training at Lauterstein-Conway which was known as the best massage school in the US at the time. I am also an esthetician but do not practice much of that privately.  As an esthetician, I am occassionally a featured writer with Dermascope magazine. My parent company is Brainy Spa Girl, LLC where I create online course content for other massage therapists and have a skin ... View Profile
During a hot stone massage, the therapist heats as many as 50 basalt stones of varying sizes to 120–140 degrees fahrenheit, rubs them over your oiled body, and rests them on top of and beneath you. The therapist places the stones on your stomach, in your palms, and on your back. The stones’ warmth enhances the relaxing effects of the pressure. Some people believe the stones have healing, grounding qualities, which makes hot stone massage a more profound experience than your basic massage. The therapist will leave some of the smooth, heated massage stones in contact with your body and use others to massage you. Cold stones are sometimes incorporated, especially on the face, where they have a firming effect. Hot stone is a feel-good treatment found on most spa menus. Hot and cold stone temperatures have said to be like the ‘vascular gymnastics’ of the circulatory systems, the system that controls self-healing in the body. The heat of the stones has an immediately relaxing effect, and the therapist will glide them along your back and limbs. They should never be uncomfortably hot or nudge a shoulder blade or the spine. If they do, speak up. You may be asked to lie down on the hot stones, which looks potentially uncomfortable but isn’t as long as they’ve been carefully arranged to make contact with soft tissue. Read more about Hot Stone Massage in Spafinder's post, What is a Hot Stone Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Swedish massage is proven to lower blood pressure and reduce stress, according to the International Journal of Preventative Medicine, as well as to relieve depression and anxiety and aid in recuperation from chronic illness. Swedish massage is also referred to as classical massage, and — contrary to popular understanding — does not originate from Sweden. There are five main strokes, or movements, that make up a Swedish massage: effleurage, friction, petrissage, tapotement and vibration. Each technique was created to help soothe, stimulate, soften, and rejuvenate muscles and other soft tissue.
During Thai massage the therapist puts you through a series of stretches that cover the entire body. You lie on a floor mat or on a table wide enough to accommodate you and the therapist, and you wear loose-fitting clothing, often supplied by the spa, because there’s no way a sheet can stay put during these moves! The therapist might kneel on the back of your legs and pull your arms to arch your back and open your chest, or place her shoulder under your heel to lift your leg and stretch your hamstring. Thai massage also includes deep pressure-point work to stimulate the sen, or the body’s energy pathways. Thai massage is a little intense at first especially if you’re used to Swedish massage and don’t normally do much stretching. It reminds you that massage isn’t just pressure applied to you by someone else, but a balancing of the body by limbering joints and loosening muscles through movement and strategic pressure. Unlike Swedish massage, there’s a lot of interaction here between you and your therapist. To move you around the mat efficiently, the Thai massage therapist uses his or her body to leverage you into the elongating stretches. He or she also will use your body as a tool for deepening these stretches by sitting on your feet and legs or pushing or pulling you into twists. Read more about Thai Massage with Spafinder's What is Thai Massage? post. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.

"The Groupon is a great value for money. It’s a low frills place but great to have nearby and a nice place to spend a couple of hours with the saunas, steam room, hot tub and pool. When we arrived we were told we were not allowed to use our Groupon on a Sunday though this was not written in the Groupon deal terms. The manager was nice and let us in, but I’d recommend the terms be made clear for this deal and when it can be used.."-Rachel C.
Whether you’re just getting started with a Swedish massage or reflexology, enjoying a romantic couple’s massage for two, or healing your body with a sports massage, Spafinder's listings include quality providers with endless modalities and customizations at a spa or wellness locations near you. If you’re going to unwind or you want to work out stubborn kinks, make sure you find the right massage for your needs. Often the massage therapist will customize treatments to address any concerns you may have and to make the massage perfect for you. Wear what feels comfortable to get the most out of your experience and be sure to speak up about what feels good and what doesn’t - this experience is all about you! To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?
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