For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
"We had the couples massage special and it was lovely. Tatiana (facialist) and Carmina (masseuse) we’re very friendly and did a great job. We felt so much better afterward. We got the wine and chocolates and they let us hang and relax and drink as much wine as we wanted. Overall a great experience and would highly recommend it. No issues with Groupon and I was able to book over the phone."-Virginia I.

Enjoy 25,000 square feet of spa paradise at this Texas resort's LakeHouse Spa, where a mix of ancient and modern therapeutic techniques are practiced. Spa packages include a couple's package in the private in-ground spa (services include a Quench Body Wrap, lunch at the café and, of course, massages) and a mother-daughter package (includes aromatherapy and manicures/pedicures). Acupuncture, floating meditation and "inner strength" massages are also available. 

During a hot stone massage, the therapist heats as many as 50 basalt stones of varying sizes to 120–140 degrees fahrenheit, rubs them over your oiled body, and rests them on top of and beneath you. The therapist places the stones on your stomach, in your palms, and on your back. The stones’ warmth enhances the relaxing effects of the pressure. Some people believe the stones have healing, grounding qualities, which makes hot stone massage a more profound experience than your basic massage. The therapist will leave some of the smooth, heated massage stones in contact with your body and use others to massage you. Cold stones are sometimes incorporated, especially on the face, where they have a firming effect. Hot stone is a feel-good treatment found on most spa menus. Hot and cold stone temperatures have said to be like the ‘vascular gymnastics’ of the circulatory systems, the system that controls self-healing in the body. The heat of the stones has an immediately relaxing effect, and the therapist will glide them along your back and limbs. They should never be uncomfortably hot or nudge a shoulder blade or the spine. If they do, speak up. You may be asked to lie down on the hot stones, which looks potentially uncomfortable but isn’t as long as they’ve been carefully arranged to make contact with soft tissue. Read more about Hot Stone Massage in Spafinder's post, What is a Hot Stone Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.

As it was pointed above, NAPA is represented not only in the United States but also in several other countries, including Canada and Mexico. At this point, we will reveal what are the typical working hours of NAPA stores in the United States. If you wish to get to know about the hours of a particular NAPA store or NAPA stores beyond the United States, we can suggest you make use of the instructions given above: call a small box in the left-upper corner of the map and click on the “View Larger Map” text button.


It used to be that New Yorkers searching for a luxurious destination spa experience had to board a plane, until the Lodge at Woodloch (just two hours from NYC) arrived in 2006 with 57 nature-inspired rooms (each with a private veranda) and a 40,000-square-foot spa. The 150 wooded acres feature a private 15-acre lake, and there's no stone unturned in terms of what you can do to get healthy: from golf to kayaking to fly fishing; from snowshoeing and hot tubbing amidst snowflakes; from bathing in the hydro massage pools to working up a sweat at TRX, spin or yoga sessions.
For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
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