Sports massage provides benefits such as improved fitness, endurance, and performance as well as increased flexibility, recovery time, and injury prevention. But sports massage is more than just a massage for athletes. Traditionally, sports massage is a deep tissue massage that targets the deepest layers of muscle in order to stimulate blood flow. It is best done before or after an event as a means to later restore or rehabilitate. Sports massage is given within the four hours preceding an event to improve performance and help decrease injuries. It is used as a supplement to an athlete’s warm up, to enhance circulation, and to reduce excess muscle and mental tension prior to competition. It is normally shorter than a regular conditioning massage, running 10 to 15 minutes, and focuses on warming up the major muscles to be used. Getting the athlete in a good mental state for competition is another benefit. Sports massage also improves tissue pliability, readying the athlete for top performance. Certain massage techniques can help calm a nervous athlete; others can be stimulating. Post-event sports massage is given after a competition and is mainly focused on recovery. It is geared toward reducing muscle spasms and metabolic build-up that occurs with vigorous exercise. Recovery after competition involves not only tissue normalization and repair, but also general relaxation and mental calming. A recovery session can range from 15 minutes to 1.5 hours in length. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.

I'm  a caring, passionate licensed massage therapist with over 17 years experience. I enjoy helping people to feel better through the nurturing power of therapeutic touch. I've  worked with athletes with sports injuries and weekend warriors and my sessions are uniquely and specifically tailored to your needs to ease your stress and tension and alleviate pain. 
TRU Health and Wellness Center is a Rehabilitation facility that focuses on the overall health of our clients.  We offer Chiropractic, Physical Therapy, and Bodywork.  Our Bodywork Sessions include full body 50 minute Thaifusion Massage and an Chiropractic adjustment.  All of our care is tailored to the needs of our clients.. no cookie cutter treatment here.

A deep tissue full body massage is a form of healing bodywork. At your first massage, your massage therapist will do a brief intake. They will ask you questions about the type of pressure you’d like to receive during your deep tissue massage, any previous massage experience you’ve had, and any injuries or sensitivities you have. You can remain clothed, or the massage therapist will provide draping so that even if you’re not wearing clothes you are always fully covered. Deep tissue massage may be a good option for people with chronic pain or muscle tension. The systematic deep tissue strokes will work to break down any scar tissue or stiff tissues and create ease in your body again. Massage therapists use their hands, forearms, fists and knuckles to knead and stroke your muscles and loosen adhesions. Although deep tissue massage work is intense, it should not be painful, so communicate clearly with your massage therapist so they know if you’re having any discomfort. The national average cost of a deep tissue massage is between $70 and $90.

During Thai massage the therapist puts you through a series of stretches that cover the entire body. You lie on a floor mat or on a table wide enough to accommodate you and the therapist, and you wear loose-fitting clothing, often supplied by the spa, because there’s no way a sheet can stay put during these moves! The therapist might kneel on the back of your legs and pull your arms to arch your back and open your chest, or place her shoulder under your heel to lift your leg and stretch your hamstring. Thai massage also includes deep pressure-point work to stimulate the sen, or the body’s energy pathways. Thai massage is a little intense at first especially if you’re used to Swedish massage and don’t normally do much stretching. It reminds you that massage isn’t just pressure applied to you by someone else, but a balancing of the body by limbering joints and loosening muscles through movement and strategic pressure. Unlike Swedish massage, there’s a lot of interaction here between you and your therapist. To move you around the mat efficiently, the Thai massage therapist uses his or her body to leverage you into the elongating stretches. He or she also will use your body as a tool for deepening these stretches by sitting on your feet and legs or pushing or pulling you into twists. Read more about Thai Massage with Spafinder's What is Thai Massage? post. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.


For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type. 
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