"Massage is a necessity no a luxury" that is our belive and because of that we offer personalized therapies, design to target that what the client desire and allow us to deliver results faster. our therapist have been in the industrie for 5 to 10 yrs aldo hold the license in other states and we have esthetic license, certification in Swedish massage, deep tissue, lymphatic drainage, sport massage, geriatric, prenatal, oncology, medical, kinesiotape, hot stone, neuromuscular and more. ... View Profile
Sports massage provides benefits such as improved fitness, endurance, and performance as well as increased flexibility, recovery time, and injury prevention. But sports massage is more than just a massage for athletes. Traditionally, sports massage is a deep tissue massage that targets the deepest layers of muscle in order to stimulate blood flow. It is best done before or after an event as a means to later restore or rehabilitate. Sports massage is given within the four hours preceding an event to improve performance and help decrease injuries. It is used as a supplement to an athlete’s warm up, to enhance circulation, and to reduce excess muscle and mental tension prior to competition. It is normally shorter than a regular conditioning massage, running 10 to 15 minutes, and focuses on warming up the major muscles to be used. Getting the athlete in a good mental state for competition is another benefit. Sports massage also improves tissue pliability, readying the athlete for top performance. Certain massage techniques can help calm a nervous athlete; others can be stimulating. Post-event sports massage is given after a competition and is mainly focused on recovery. It is geared toward reducing muscle spasms and metabolic build-up that occurs with vigorous exercise. Recovery after competition involves not only tissue normalization and repair, but also general relaxation and mental calming. A recovery session can range from 15 minutes to 1.5 hours in length. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type. 

Hi, my name is Eiki (pronounced as "Achy") Yoshikawa. I was born in Kyoto Japan in 1966. After I graduated from a Japanese university in 1991, I transferred to and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin majoring in Psychology in 1993. After living in the San Francisco bay area for 10 years, including 7 years with a leading high-tech company, I returened to Austin in January, 2004. In 2005, I decided to study and earned the Cerificate of American Sign Language Studies from Austin Community College. In the same year, I started my massage therapy training at The Lauterstein-Conway Massage School, where I completed 300 hours of tra ... View Profile

Rejuvenate at a hotel spa where you can still sneak in some Rodeo Drive shopping during the day. This Beverly Hills luxury hotel spa is centered around a mineral wellness pool. The 20,000-square-foot space is inspired by the Spanish Colonial Revival, and packages include the "Day of Indulgence," which offers a body rescue massage, facial and manicure/pedicure, plus lunch credit.
"The Groupon is a great value for money. It’s a low frills place but great to have nearby and a nice place to spend a couple of hours with the saunas, steam room, hot tub and pool. When we arrived we were told we were not allowed to use our Groupon on a Sunday though this was not written in the Groupon deal terms. The manager was nice and let us in, but I’d recommend the terms be made clear for this deal and when it can be used.."-Rachel C.
Sports massage provides benefits such as improved fitness, endurance, and performance as well as increased flexibility, recovery time, and injury prevention. But sports massage is more than just a massage for athletes. Traditionally, sports massage is a deep tissue massage that targets the deepest layers of muscle in order to stimulate blood flow. It is best done before or after an event as a means to later restore or rehabilitate. Sports massage is given within the four hours preceding an event to improve performance and help decrease injuries. It is used as a supplement to an athlete’s warm up, to enhance circulation, and to reduce excess muscle and mental tension prior to competition. It is normally shorter than a regular conditioning massage, running 10 to 15 minutes, and focuses on warming up the major muscles to be used. Getting the athlete in a good mental state for competition is another benefit. Sports massage also improves tissue pliability, readying the athlete for top performance. Certain massage techniques can help calm a nervous athlete; others can be stimulating. Post-event sports massage is given after a competition and is mainly focused on recovery. It is geared toward reducing muscle spasms and metabolic build-up that occurs with vigorous exercise. Recovery after competition involves not only tissue normalization and repair, but also general relaxation and mental calming. A recovery session can range from 15 minutes to 1.5 hours in length. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
If you’re looking for a remote getaway, it doesn’t get more private than a spa tucked away in the stunning canyons of the Southwest. Amangiri’s spa facilities are the epitome of luxury: meditate in the Floatation Pavilion (a pool in which the water and air both match your body temperature), lounge in a heated stone-lined pool, or switch between the soothing steam room and the cool plunge pool.

Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.


Swedish massage is defined by four or five somewhat familiar techniques, which have French names: effleurage (stroking), petrissage (kneading), tapotement (rhythmic choppings), and friction (rubbing). Some therapists now incorporate advanced techniques that have rehabilitating effects and stretches for improving your range of motion. But the ultimate goal here is relaxation. As the default Western massage, Swedish massage is an extremely popular, simple, soothing touch therapy. At most spas, Swedish massage is the most popular treatment, and it’s for good reason. Perfect for first-time spa-goers, Swedish massage will help to release neck knots and sooth nerves. Traditional Swedish massage, or “classical massage,” consists mainly of long strokes over oiled skin and kneading of the outer layers of muscle tissue to reduce stress and sooth sore joints and muscles. Studies have shown Swedish massage relaxes the nervous system, aids circulation, and helps with detoxification. Find out more about Swedish Massage in Spafinder's What is Swedish Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type. 

This destination spa boasts a stunning red rock backdrop and offers rejuvenating Native American-inspired therapies such as "Spirit of the New Moon," which begins with you writing down an intention, followed by a foot bath and fully body massage and "Inner Quest." For the latter, reflective of Native American rituals, sweet grass is burned and a blanket is used to create the warmth of a sweat lodge. New offerings include an exfoliation inspired by the southwest region's pinon nut and directional meditation inspired by indigenous medicine wheel practices.
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