At this year-round luxury destination, pampering is prime at the five-star spa, where you'll find hot and cold plunge baths, couple treatment rooms, Vichy wet treatment rooms and even a hair and makeup salon. Try a gemstone facial (meant to dramatically increase hydration) or an alpine glow body wrap (featuring immune-boosting honeybee propolis to rejuvenate dry skin).
For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
Not only does this resort offer everything from animal safaris to zip lines, but its spa is also topnotch (besides, you need a way to relax after all those activities!). Wellness retreats are offered throughout the year with both daylong and multi-day options, and regular spa treatments include herbal wraps, spa reflexology and a water bath ritual meant to improve blood and lymph flow.

Based on the transferring of energy, Reiki is said to release blocked energy from parts of your body while moving it to the areas that are in need of healing. Originating from Japan, the technique requires the Reiki Master to place hands just above the body or lightly touching the body as the client lays on the massage table fully clothed. Reiki healing is intended to help the client relax and de-stress, heal physical or emotional pain, detoxify the body, help aid in the healing process, gain universal life energy, and even stimulate the immune system. Typically a Reiki session has you laying on a massage table fully-clothed for 50-minutes to an hour. The master will place his or her hands over the areas of your body that contain blocked energy. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
My mission is to restore the health of my patients and improve their lives through alternative treatments. I am mainly a Body Therapist, but I often use or recommend other alternative methods, such as yoga or herbs, for ongoing treatment. I've learned to share my experience through a combination of service and education. I’m a passionate healer with an alternative approach, and I’m dedicated to helping my clients move through a wide range of physical, emotional, and spiritual transitions in the most efficient and transformative way possible. My mission is to heal, but also to teach my clients a better approach to their o ... View Profile
For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
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