This destination spa boasts a stunning red rock backdrop and offers rejuvenating Native American-inspired therapies such as "Spirit of the New Moon," which begins with you writing down an intention, followed by a foot bath and fully body massage and "Inner Quest." For the latter, reflective of Native American rituals, sweet grass is burned and a blanket is used to create the warmth of a sweat lodge. New offerings include an exfoliation inspired by the southwest region's pinon nut and directional meditation inspired by indigenous medicine wheel practices.


"Massage is a necessity no a luxury" that is our belive and because of that we offer personalized therapies, design to target that what the client desire and allow us to deliver results faster. our therapist have been in the industrie for 5 to 10 yrs aldo hold the license in other states and we have esthetic license, certification in Swedish massage, deep tissue, lymphatic drainage, sport massage, geriatric, prenatal, oncology, medical, kinesiotape, hot stone, neuromuscular and more. ... View Profile
Hello! My name is Daniell. I am a skilled and highly trained healthcare professional with over 13 years experience as a licensed massage therapist. I am a recent graduate from Texas Woman’s University and I have a Master’s Degree in Exercise Science and Human Movement. I am currently enrolled in my Doctorate of Health Sciences. I specialize in rehabilitation therapy, cardiac rehab, and health and wellness. Other specialities include ECG Monitoring and interpretations, VO2Max/submax testing, exercise testing and prescription, vital signs, stress testing, Deep Tissue, Myofascial Release, Trigger Point, Lymphatic Drainage, Reflexolog ... View Profile
Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type. 

I am not only a massage therapist but a nutritionist & trainer as well with a specialty in Sports Therapy and Recovery. I have been working 1 on 1 with many amateur & pro athletes over the last 5 years & also have almost 20 years of rehab, injury recovery and prevention experience.  Looking to do more locally after having my last child to stay closer to home so I'm now open to take on local general clients as I embark on a new journey with my wellness & fitness center. ... View Profile
For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
×