Based on the transferring of energy, Reiki is said to release blocked energy from parts of your body while moving it to the areas that are in need of healing. Originating from Japan, the technique requires the Reiki Master to place hands just above the body or lightly touching the body as the client lays on the massage table fully clothed. Reiki healing is intended to help the client relax and de-stress, heal physical or emotional pain, detoxify the body, help aid in the healing process, gain universal life energy, and even stimulate the immune system. Typically a Reiki session has you laying on a massage table fully-clothed for 50-minutes to an hour. The master will place his or her hands over the areas of your body that contain blocked energy. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
"We had the couples massage special and it was lovely. Tatiana (facialist) and Carmina (masseuse) we’re very friendly and did a great job. We felt so much better afterward. We got the wine and chocolates and they let us hang and relax and drink as much wine as we wanted. Overall a great experience and would highly recommend it. No issues with Groupon and I was able to book over the phone."-Virginia I.

I am not only a massage therapist but a nutritionist & trainer as well with a specialty in Sports Therapy and Recovery. I have been working 1 on 1 with many amateur & pro athletes over the last 5 years & also have almost 20 years of rehab, injury recovery and prevention experience.  Looking to do more locally after having my last child to stay closer to home so I'm now open to take on local general clients as I embark on a new journey with my wellness & fitness center. ... View Profile
The National Automotive Parts Association was founded back in 1925 with an aim to provide the automotive products for a cheaper price than was available at that time. Over time, the company has grown into one of the largest automotive retailers in the United States – there are more than 6,000 NAPA stores scattered across the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the several Caribbean and Latin American countries.
"We had the couples massage special and it was lovely. Tatiana (facialist) and Carmina (masseuse) we’re very friendly and did a great job. We felt so much better afterward. We got the wine and chocolates and they let us hang and relax and drink as much wine as we wanted. Overall a great experience and would highly recommend it. No issues with Groupon and I was able to book over the phone."-Virginia I.
The National Automotive Parts Association is owned by the Genuine Parts Company. Its parent company also purchased Exego Group, a major Australian distributor of automotive parts and accessories, in 2013. Even though Exego Group previously sold products and goods under the “Repco” brand, it has been recently spotted that many of the Repco stores have been rebranded into NAPA stores.
The practice of using essential oils dates back to Egyptian times (it’s been said Cleopatra was a fan). Today, aromatherapy is used to promote well-being and stimulate the senses in a wide range of spa treatments, varying from massage to facials to hydrotherapy. Fragrant essential extracts sourced from plants, flowers, and herbs are mainly applied for their therapeutic benefits; studies show aromatherapy not only improves your mood, but may reduce stress levels and treat insomnia. So whether you want to rejuvenate or simply smell delicious, we say aromatherapy just makes sense! Step into a spa and one of the first things you’ll notice is a signature scent wafting in the air. It’s there to entice your senses straight off the bat and sets the tone for a relaxed experience. Not only is aromatherapy used to set the mood in a spa, it’s celebrated for healing purposes as well. Different natural oils are used for different therapeutic benefits. For example, lavender endorses calm, so speak with your therapist about what you’d like to accomplish during your treatment. To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?

For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.

Thai massage, also called Thai yoga massage, combines acupressure and assisted yoga postures. Thai massage is based on the flow of energy through the body and focuses on energy lines called “sen.” It doesn’t use oils or lotions and, instead of rubbing muscles, the massage therapist compresses, pulls, stretches and rocks the recipient’s body to promote the flow of energy through these sen. In this form of massage therapy, practitioners use their hands, knees, legs and feet to apply deep muscle compression and stretch the body. It’s often performed on a mat on the floor instead of on a massage table. Like most forms of massage, Thai massage is used to relieve stress, improve range of motion and enhance flexibility. Some people also use Thai massage to address a range of health issues, including:  
Not only does this resort offer everything from animal safaris to zip lines, but its spa is also topnotch (besides, you need a way to relax after all those activities!). Wellness retreats are offered throughout the year with both daylong and multi-day options, and regular spa treatments include herbal wraps, spa reflexology and a water bath ritual meant to improve blood and lymph flow.
If you’re looking for a remote getaway, it doesn’t get more private than a spa tucked away in the stunning canyons of the Southwest. Amangiri’s spa facilities are the epitome of luxury: meditate in the Floatation Pavilion (a pool in which the water and air both match your body temperature), lounge in a heated stone-lined pool, or switch between the soothing steam room and the cool plunge pool.
Hello! My name is Daniell. I am a skilled and highly trained healthcare professional with over 13 years experience as a licensed massage therapist. I am a recent graduate from Texas Woman’s University and I have a Master’s Degree in Exercise Science and Human Movement. I am currently enrolled in my Doctorate of Health Sciences. I specialize in rehabilitation therapy, cardiac rehab, and health and wellness. Other specialities include ECG Monitoring and interpretations, VO2Max/submax testing, exercise testing and prescription, vital signs, stress testing, Deep Tissue, Myofascial Release, Trigger Point, Lymphatic Drainage, Reflexolog ... View Profile
I am not only a massage therapist but a nutritionist & trainer as well with a specialty in Sports Therapy and Recovery. I have been working 1 on 1 with many amateur & pro athletes over the last 5 years & also have almost 20 years of rehab, injury recovery and prevention experience.  Looking to do more locally after having my last child to stay closer to home so I'm now open to take on local general clients as I embark on a new journey with my wellness & fitness center. ... View Profile
Reflexology is the practice of stimulating points on the feet that are thought to correspond to specific parts of the body. It is based on a reflexology chart or “zone theory” that maps out the body on the foot. It is not an everyday foot massage. Reflexology involves kneading the soft fleshy ball of the foot, pulling on the toes, tracing around the heel, and pushing deep into the arch. These are just a few of the many small, intense movements you’ll experience. While some spots may feel more sensitive than others, reflexologists will often say that pain indicates blocks in the energy pathways or weak organs and isn’t due to the pressure of the touch. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on hands or ears to trigger relaxation. Some people say they feel hot or cold sensations. During a reflexology session, you’re clothed and seated or lying down while the therapist rubs, presses on, and squeezes points on your feet. The therapist may concentrate on specific areas to alleviate ailments (if you have sinus trouble, she’ll focus on your toes) or work on the whole foot with the aim of strengthening every system in the body. Read more about Reflexology with What is Reflexology? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type.
"The facility is beautiful and clean. They did an amazing job with the ambiance and atmosphere. Melissa at the front desk was courteous and the owners took time to speak with every customer who walked out the door to check on their experience. Definitely the most personable and welcoming people I've had the pleasure of meeting. Brittany and Brandi did a great job with our massages. They made sure we were comfortable and satisfied the whole time and at no point did they make us feel as if they were rushing us. Without a doubt, one of the best massages I've ever had and I already can't wait to go back!"
Therapeutic Massage (Deep Tissue, Sports Massage, Therapeutic Stretch) As a Licensed Massage Therapist (LMT), my goal is to offer a customized massage for YOUR specific needs.  Time is taken to not only address the issues you are experiencing but to provide nurturing and relaxation for the parasympathetic nervous system to combat stress and anxiety also. Hot AND Cold Stones are effective for healing and I use both in my practice. As a Registered Yoga Teacher, I utilize breath and stretch techniques when applicable during my massage sessions. ... View Profile
Hi, my name is Eiki (pronounced as "Achy") Yoshikawa. I was born in Kyoto Japan in 1966. After I graduated from a Japanese university in 1991, I transferred to and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin majoring in Psychology in 1993. After living in the San Francisco bay area for 10 years, including 7 years with a leading high-tech company, I returened to Austin in January, 2004. In 2005, I decided to study and earned the Cerificate of American Sign Language Studies from Austin Community College. In the same year, I started my massage therapy training at The Lauterstein-Conway Massage School, where I completed 300 hours of tra ... View Profile

This destination spa boasts a stunning red rock backdrop and offers rejuvenating Native American-inspired therapies such as "Spirit of the New Moon," which begins with you writing down an intention, followed by a foot bath and fully body massage and "Inner Quest." For the latter, reflective of Native American rituals, sweet grass is burned and a blanket is used to create the warmth of a sweat lodge. New offerings include an exfoliation inspired by the southwest region's pinon nut and directional meditation inspired by indigenous medicine wheel practices.
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