"Wow. I'm not one to write reviews but I think I would be doing many a disservice if I didn't share what I just experienced with Josie. 1st impression: Josie was very prompt to get in touch with me after my initial request on thumbtack which to me, goes a long way with showing professionalism. We were able to set up our 1st meeting quickly with her online booking calendar. Massage: It has been over three years since my last massage. I was due. I have extreme tightness in my middle back, shoulders, and hamstrings from working out and playing golf (while rarely warming up). After telling her what I thought I needed, Josie went ahead and got after my "problem areas" and then found some other areas I didn't even think needed work! Its obvious shes been doing this a long time, as she has a knack for knowing where I needed work without me even knowing myself. It impresses me when someone can be so in tune with what they do, it looks effortless. Conclusion: I am very happy with my decision to get some bodywork done. A massage, like a tire alignment or oil change to a car, is important self-maintenance. I will not be going three more years without a massage anymore after the service Josie provided. As a matter of fact I already have one scheduled at the beginning of June. Thank you Josie!"
Swedish massage is proven to lower blood pressure and reduce stress, according to the International Journal of Preventative Medicine, as well as to relieve depression and anxiety and aid in recuperation from chronic illness. Swedish massage is also referred to as classical massage, and — contrary to popular understanding — does not originate from Sweden. There are five main strokes, or movements, that make up a Swedish massage: effleurage, friction, petrissage, tapotement and vibration. Each technique was created to help soothe, stimulate, soften, and rejuvenate muscles and other soft tissue.
A deep tissue full body massage is a form of healing bodywork. At your first massage, your massage therapist will do a brief intake. They will ask you questions about the type of pressure you’d like to receive during your deep tissue massage, any previous massage experience you’ve had, and any injuries or sensitivities you have. You can remain clothed, or the massage therapist will provide draping so that even if you’re not wearing clothes you are always fully covered. Deep tissue massage may be a good option for people with chronic pain or muscle tension. The systematic deep tissue strokes will work to break down any scar tissue or stiff tissues and create ease in your body again. Massage therapists use their hands, forearms, fists and knuckles to knead and stroke your muscles and loosen adhesions. Although deep tissue massage work is intense, it should not be painful, so communicate clearly with your massage therapist so they know if you’re having any discomfort. The national average cost of a deep tissue massage is between $70 and $90.
I'm  a caring, passionate licensed massage therapist with over 17 years experience. I enjoy helping people to feel better through the nurturing power of therapeutic touch. I've  worked with athletes with sports injuries and weekend warriors and my sessions are uniquely and specifically tailored to your needs to ease your stress and tension and alleviate pain. 
Welcome, and thank you for visiting the home of Body Beneficial Massage and Wellness, L.L.C! Opened in 2015, Body Beneficial Massage & Wellness is an independently owned and operated body therapy company offering custom-tailored, mobile massage services, in the City of Dallas and select surrounding areas. A private in-home massage session allows you to enjoy the safety and serenity of your personal home, where you can completely relax and enjoy your session. If you have been looking for a licensed massage therapist to fulfill your therapeutic needs in a professional manner, then you have come to the right place. ... View Profile

Not only does this resort offer everything from animal safaris to zip lines, but its spa is also topnotch (besides, you need a way to relax after all those activities!). Wellness retreats are offered throughout the year with both daylong and multi-day options, and regular spa treatments include herbal wraps, spa reflexology and a water bath ritual meant to improve blood and lymph flow.

For thousands of years, Eastern healers have used pressure-point massage to balance the body. Shiatsu is the Japanese version. The idea is that chi, or life energy, flows through the body in 14 meridians. When the meridians are blocked, physical or emotional problems result. During a shiatsu massage, you lie on a floor mat while the therapist gently rocks and stretches your body and applies finger and thumb pressure to points. The purpose can be to stimulate or to subdue energy, making shiatsu invigorating as well as relaxing. Shiatsu treats your whole being rather than a single aspect of your body. Spas recommend it for stubborn knots, sports injuries, and back pain, and say the pressure can help trigger the release of chemicals, like cortisone, that help the body heal itself. Shiatsu means “finger pressure” in Japanese, but that doesn’t begin to cover it. Shiatsu therapists use their thumbs as well as elbows, knees, and feet to apply strategic pressure to muscles and connective tissues. Practitioners of Zen or Five Elements shiatsu therapy use the pressure-point massage for another reason. Namely, to balance the body’s chi, a practice that comes from Traditional Chinese Medicine. In both cases, you typically wear loose-fitting clothing, and it’s done on a floor mat. Expect intense pressure and a fair bit of movement as the therapist stretches your muscles and alleviates knots and pain. While it’s languid enough to ultimately relax your muscles, it’s not likely something you’ll sleep through. Some therapists will spend a lot of time on your hara (stomach), which is considered the root of imbalance in Five Elements shiatsu. Read more about Shiatsu Massage in Spafinder's post, What is Shiatsu Massage? To help you find the massage that fits your specific needs, read Spafinder's guide to Which Massage is Right For You?, or select one of the links on this page for a different massage type. 
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